Thursday, December 29, 2011

E- to Print

I came across this interesting bit of promo on an endcap when I was out shopping at the brick-and-mortar B&N:



I wondered why the flyer was made of cardstock-weight paper, and then saw the preforation line. The end of the flyer can be torn off to use as a bookmark (with helpful bullet reminders of the release dates for each installment.) To tempt buyers who have already read the e-book versions, which I assume were the self-published works that made the author a sensation, there's also the promise of "all-new bonus stories" in each volume.

This is one of those odd marketing experiments in Publishing that I like to observe. I think in certain ways the publisher and the author are thinking outside the box, and it should be interesting to see what happens on the shelf. This could even turn out to be a unique alternative to the traditional submissions process: self-pub first, start earning income, and once you've racked up enough numbers to prove you're marketable use them to negotiate a print contract.

Also, for those of you with a BAM in your area, this week calendars and planners are 50% off; and I think they'll be even cheaper after the new year. I went ahead and got my 2012 fix:

7 comments:

  1. Keita Haruka10:55 AM

    Mmm...my question is, if one is already making money directly marketing your own work and successfully selling it, why do you need a publisher at all? If publishing goes in that direction, I can see them turning into nothing more than printers. And maybe that's a good thing? I don't know. :-)

    Mmm! Calendars! I'll ask my partner to get me this year's wolf calendar. I got it last year when I was there and it gave a whole year of loveliness.

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  2. Keita wrote: my question is, if one is already making money directly marketing your own work and successfully selling it, why do you need a publisher at all?

    Some writers don't feel they do, and are making the switch over to digital self-pub because it can be quite profitable. If the trend continues, it will definitely be a viable career alternative.

    The one drawback to me is that digi self-pubbing means no print copies, and no distribution of print copies. While I appreciate the popularity of e-readers, I don't see them replacing print just yet. Too many lifelong book lovers out there want hard copies, and other than traditional publishing houses, there's still no provider that will print them at no cost to the writer and low cost to the consumer. Gloval print distribution is another knot Amazon and other digi platform providers have yet to unravel.

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  3. Gloval = Global, sorry. I'm still Queen of Planet Typo.

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  4. A pretty nifty marketing idea. I always have to wonder though why, if she wrote so well that she was a self publishing sensation, what was wrong with her writing/story/what have you, that a traditional publisher didn't originally pick her up.

    Just another of those odd thoughts that floats through my head from time to time.

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  5. Actually, a very neat marketing ploy for readers and marketers alike. I wonder if it will work. ;-)

    BTW I have now finished my first year as an indie-published author on kindle (ebook only). I have learned a few things and hope that I can write better and more in the new year.

    One of the reasons I decided to go indie is because I have learned that I like to control my own product. Plus I just don't have the energy (I have a life-threatening disease) to deal with agents and publishers. It has been a great learning experience.

    Happy New Year to all - and hope you all get what you wish for this year.

    Cyn

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  6. Theo wrote: I always have to wonder though why, if she wrote so well that she was a self publishing sensation, what was wrong with her writing/story/what have you, that a traditional publisher didn't originally pick her up.

    I don't personally know her story, but one possibility is that she wasn't willing to wait and go through the traditional submission process, which we all know is very slow. I started subbing proposals pretty much on a weekly basis back in 1988, and didn't get my first offer until 1998. Back then there were more houses willing to look at an unagented sub, too; now I think only a couple will. Add to that the sheer volume of submissions every house receives and you can imagine how easy it is for a decent writer to get lost in the slush shuffle.

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  7. Cyn wrote: Actually, a very neat marketing ploy for readers and marketers alike. I wonder if it will work. ;-)

    The great cover art and unstinting support from her publisher won't hurt. I think there is a lot of curiosity about the author, too, and that never hurts sales (at least on the first book.)

    BTW I have now finished my first year as an indie-published author on kindle (ebook only). I have learned a few things and hope that I can write better and more in the new year.

    Congrats!

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