Thursday, March 20, 2008

Take the Fall

When readers ask me which of the Darkyn books is my favorite (and hold a gun to my head to make me answer them) I think I usually say Dark Need. Writing Lucan as I actually envisioned him versus serving up the expected romance wonderbread version was an amazing experience. I never had so much fun, or colored so far outside the lines. It definitely helped me prepare for what I wanted to do when I set out to write Valentin's story in Twilight Fall.

No one but my editor has read TF yet, and she didn't say much, other than fix this and explain that (when you get to my stage of the game, they rarely do.) So I don't really know how it's going to be received. I try not to over-analyze my work, but in my head I keep making up these little novel billboards, and seeing myself in July on TF release day planting them down the length of the bookstore V aisle, like those old Burma Shave road signs:

Caution: Unconventional Protagonists

And Multiple Plot Lines Ahead

Exit Now, Militant Feminists

Because This Sure Ain't Wonderbread


and maybe a nice big shelf sitter, right in front of Twilight Fall, because I know I'm going to get grief for it:

Warning! Ends on Series Cliffhanger*

Sure, I probably could have saved myself a lot of hassle by penning a vanilla-pop version of Val, or churning out a clone of Night Lost or Evermore. But what fun would that be to write? And what would I do with all my nifty new signs?

I do have a nice stack of ARCs to pass along to those of you still willing to take TF for a test drive, so in comments to this post, name a writer who you think takes interesting risks with their work (or if you only read the safe and predictable sort, just throw your name in the hat) by midnight EST on Monday, March 24, 2008. I'll draw ten names at random from all the daredevils who participate and send the winners a signed ARC of my sixth Darkyn novel, Twilight Fall. This giveaway is open to everyone on the planet, even if you've won something at PBW in the past.

*Val's story is resolved in the book, but someone else's gets much more interesting.

105 comments:

  1. You are terrible. This is pure sheer torture.

    Definitely count me in.

    Hmmmm, who takes risks? Well, there's you.

    Bettie Sharpe. Her freebie ebook Ember? Blew me away.

    Definitely a risk taker there.

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  2. I love Sheri S Tepper, although I'm not sure how risky that is. I've love to be thrown in the hat... or at least my name anyway. :)

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  3. Suzanne Brockmann for bringing the wedding of her gay characters Jules and Robin to mainstream romance in All Through The Night.

    Twilight Fall sounds fantastic. Now I will be wondering whose story gets much more interesting.

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  4. I personally *prefer* authors who take risks. My bookshelves seem full of them. Let's see, there's you, obviously, the already mentioned Suzanne Brockmann, Laurell K. Hamilton (menage e...ah...what's word for four? Five?), Kim Harrison, um, on the fantasy front - Neil Gaiman, Simon Green...

    I could go on forever, I think. LOL.

    Anyway, Val has long been one of my favorites. (Though now Robin is a close second!) I would love to throw my name into the hat!

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  5. Sharon Maria Bidwell (m/m alert)
    Her most known work, “The Swithin Chronicles” (a trilogy), has m/m, m/f, and m/m/m relationships that are always unpredictably changing. And it takes place in a very unusual fantasy world.
    “Snow Angel” and “Angel Heart” (a duology) features a protagonist that a lot of people don’t like, or didn’t like at first. (But I love him! And this duology is one of my favorite love stories!)
    “A Slow Fuzzy Screw” has a rather special ending—the two protagonists are NOT in love with each other at the end. I don’t know, and they don’t know, what they are because their relationship is so complicated.

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  6. Pam Rosenthal. When I picked up Almost a Gentleman I was completely thrown out of the safety lines. She's not my favorite, but man, she's an author that takes risks.

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  7. This is why I read your books and blog! (The risk taking not the giveaways...although the giveaways are great.) ;)

    I'm definitely a fan of the unexpected, and Jennifer Armintrout is my other favorite for twists, turns, and cliffhangers.

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  8. Count me in.
    Hmm. A risk taker.... Laurell K. Hamilton, Lynsay Sands, Kim Harrison and JR Ward.

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  9. I am ubber excited. Val is my personal favorite.
    As far risk taking writers I enjoy. I am not sure if the Odd Thomas series by Dean Koontz is considered a risk, but I enjoy them.

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  10. Count me in.

    Risky writers? Try being a confessional Lutheran in my church body these days. But outside of non-fiction, hmm . . .

    Nicholas Sparks is the first name that comes to mind. He takes a risk every time he writes his predictable pap that someone will actually call him on it.

    Not what you meant? Well . . . you're probably the riskiest I've read. I do tend to read the safer authors, probably because I get so few recommendations of risky writers.

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  11. Include me please! I live for non-vanilla, and would love to read your ARC. An author, hum...Morgan Hawke. Her Intersteller Service & Discipline trilogy takes so many risks, the publisher hasn't even released the 3rd in print. She includes elements I don't usually like, but made it so interesting I totally enjoyed it anyway. (Or Kim Harrison, Gail Dayton, Rob Thurman...so many books, so little time.)

    Beki...ditto on Suzanne Brockmann. I was enjoying Jules, an interesting, well developed character. Shocked to read some of her fans ranting because it was too non-traditional for them. Wow, go read Palmer or Feehan...only the names are changed from book to book.

    Becoming cookie cutter is a sure way to slip off my auto-buy list.

    But hey...if we all liked the same things, there wouldn't be enough chocolate in the world for me!

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  12. You, Karen Traviss and Holly Lisle are a toss-up for risk taking, but Karen wins by smidgen.

    I do so hope to get one of the TF ARCs.

    Thank you for the contest!

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  13. Two authors spring to mind:

    Kim Harrison and W. Michael Gear. Both killed off main characters in sudden and shocking ways.

    Got love that kind of a risk; but it worked.

    Not as a suck-up, but as you know, Rebel Ice was controversial. Me? I thought it exactly right.

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  14. Mmm. I can't remember the last time I saw anybody in the genres I read taking a risk. Would be refreshing to see. I'll just toss my name in the hat.

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  15. Poor Elizabeth George took a good fall when she forgot about her inspector Linley and all his accolites (forgive the spelling, English is my third language!) and wrote What Came Before He Shot Her. And before that, in With No One As Witness, when she killed one of her protagonists.
    But I still love her and I can't wait for her next book.

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  16. William Gibson, whose sci-fi always makes me think hard and Ian Banks for his intense characters.

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  17. I have to say I probably read safe and predictable stuff. But I thought the way JR Ward ended Lover Unbound was sort of daring. Cant wait to read Twilight Fall please throw my name in. Thanks

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  18. Woo-iieeee! Great V aisle imagery. :) Would LOVE to have a signed TF ARC.

    Risk taker: Linda Howard - Cry No More, Kiss Me While I Sleep

    "gets much more interesting" - John??

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  19. You always do this. Give us a little information to make us yearn for more... Tease. ;)

    Count me in.

    J.R. Ward (Zadist story), You and Sherilyn Kennyon are the first who comme to my mind.

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  20. A vanilla-pop version of Val? From you? Never.

    I think Tamara Siler Jones is a risk taker. Mixing suspense and fantasy and creating Dubric--brilliant.

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  21. Congrats on your upcoming release! I definitely have to get a copy.

    So risk-takers? Hmm Well the authors coming to mind are Laurell K Hamilton, Kim Harrison, Keri Arthur, JR Ward and Yasmine Galenorn.

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  22. Okay, now I'm dying to know what happens!

    Lessee, risk takers. This is tough because writing IS risky, but off the top of my head Alan Ginsberg, Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Maya Angelou, Sherri Tepper, Ursula LeGuin.

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  23. You're the one that does it best right now.

    Although Colleen Gleason tends to stretch a reader as well in her Gardella series. If you want a book tied up with a nice hea at the end, you ain't gonna get it from her... yet.

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  24. JR Ward took a risk with V's book. And hey, don't I get an ARC from that last contest...gotta go back and check. Grins.

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  25. Stephen King, anyone? Some of his stuff I love, some I don't, but he always seems to surprise me.

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  26. JC wrote: And hey, don't I get an ARC from that last contest

    I'm so sorry -- I know I had a couple of packages returned from some giveaways sent out in January and February (I use a shipping service, and the returned packages are boxed up and sent back to me every other month.) Anyway, I'll look up your giveaway and send you out a replacement -- if your address has changes, would you send me an e-mail at LynnViehl@aol.com?

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  27. changes = changed. Sigh.

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  28. I mention him every time you talk about an author, but I think Orson Scott Card takes a lot of risks, especially in his short stories. He writes some WEIRD stuff!

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  29. I am reading Marjorie Liu's latest The Last Twilight and I really like her diversity of characters. As for writers who are venturing into something new I just discovered Clair Delacroix writing as Deborah Cooke and her dragon series. Loved the first book and can't wait for the second. Allyson James is another writer who writes in different genres. I have always loved Roberta Gellis and have followed her work throughout her career. I would love to read your need work. I love your Darklyn series but have to say that Stardoc is really extraordinary.

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  30. I'm in. I NEED that book...

    I thought I would be the only one to name Gaiman and Pratchett as two of my favorite risk takers, but I should've realized that there are lots of well-read readers of refined tastes on this site.

    And I am definitely looking into some of the authors mentioned here, cause I've been searching for some new stuff lately.

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  31. Lilith Saintcrow. She raises major plot and charcter questions, and leaves them dangling for two books at a time, and writes a protagonist that I spend half the book wanting to smack. Plus, I still don't know if the love interest is a good guy or a bad guy (one more book to go in the Dante Valentine series). And yet I love her (the protag AND the author).

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  32. You're killing me here. I'm dying of curiosity. :)
    Risk takers (besides yourself and Holly?...and Tamara): Laurie R. King, Jaqcueline Winspear, Victoria Thompson...

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  33. ooh... and ARC up for grabs!
    Risk-takers?... for sure Rachel Caine, Markus Zusak, Marcus Sakey. There are others that my brain refuses to think of this morning...this is what happens after early morning meetings.

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  34. You tease you :-)

    Definetly count me in - I soooooo want that book!

    Let's see some authors that take risks - you know this could be a long list from me.

    you (of course), Lilith Saintcrow, Keri Arthur, JR Ward, Laurekll K Hamilton (both series), Simon Green, Kim Harrison.... ok I'll stop now.

    :::peeking over shoulder to see how many times I can slip my name into the hat without being noticed::: :-)

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  35. Risk takers are Jeri-Smith Ready in her series which is great! Francine Prose in A Changed Man.

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  36. Over the last week I've become completely addicted to J.R. Ward's Black Dagger Brotherhood series. I'm halfway throught he third novel, wishing I didn't have to do pesky things like work and sleep - I'd rather be reading. I love the characters because they really do seem to have insurmountable problems. You just have to keep reading to find out how they will get out of a particular situation. I was a little wary of buying the first novel in the series because it was in the romance section of the bookstore. The last couple of dark fantasy/romance novels I got were just way too predictable. Ward's books were an awesome surprise. As soon as I finished the first book I went back and bought the next four.

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  37. I have to echo the Tamara Siler Jones comments. She's great, and Dubric isn't exactly your run-of-the-mill protagonist.

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  38. I'm going to have to agree with some of the already mentioned authors: Suzanne Brockmann, JR Ward, Laurell K Hamilton, L.A. Banks.

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  39. I can't really add to the list of "risky writers", but I read anything that catches my inner eye when I read the first page.

    Tossing my name into the hat...

    Catherine

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  40. Deanne Gist - she wrote a christian historical fiction where the protagonist has pre-marital sex...and winds up alone at the end of the book.


    I mean..can you even do that? :P

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  41. You honestly. LOL. Your science fiction, especially. I love series cliffhangers, btw...

    Shiloh Walker, Joey Hill, Christie Golden, Anne McCaffrey (as a kid her strong women drew me in like nothing else...I grew up in a "woman remains silent" type of home, so her empowerment really took hold of me), Heinlein (who also had kickass heroines) and A. Lee Martinez who writes the most hilarious pieces of fiction. Every one of his paranormal characters have draw backs that kill me. Like the guy who can't die (he regenerates) but sometimes parts of him regenerates before the others. So he could end up worse than before.

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  42. Most of the ones that I would have mentioned some one else already did.

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  43. Two authors that I can think of are Elizabeth Moon for Remnant Population and Lois Bujold McMaster for her Seven Gods series.

    E.

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  44. I have to add my nod to Suzanne Brockmann, too, but I'll toss out Flannery O'Connor as well.

    As for the ARC possibilities. . .I am already thinking of the ways I could tease my mom with it. LOL.

    Good luck all, and thanks for the chance, Lynn.

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  45. Anne Bishop. Unconventional, controversial-- she takes on just about every taboo I can think of in her Black Jewels trilogy. I've never read books so well written or so far off the radar. But perhaps that's just me.

    Kayla

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  46. Marjorie Liu comes to mind. Sherrilyn Kenyon took a huge risk with the suicide of a very popular character in her Dark-Hunter series.

    I think Lori Armstrong took a huge risk creating her character of Julie Collins who is definitely not anyone's idea of a traditional p.i./detective character. (Blood Ties, Hallowed Ground, Shallow Grave).

    There are others, but those three came to mind first -- after you, of course.

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  47. I'm going to go out on a limb and say Lynn Flewelling. I read her Nightrunner books in high school, so they are over ten years old now, but they are still some of my absolute favorite novels to read over and over again. (And I'm not really a fantasy reader.) Where did she take risks? Her two protagonists ended up falling in love. What's so risky about this? They were both men. It's not in-your-face, it's really touching the way she handles it, and I loved the characters. So please put me in the hat, and thanks for letting me recommend an author!

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  48. I'd have to say at first thought, Orson Scott Card--never predictable and has such a varied bibliography.

    *crossed fingers!*

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  49. I want to say George R.R. Martin. The first book of "Song of Ice and Fire" basically creates and then destroys one of the most likable and interesting characters in fantasy fiction. From there it's that everything's going to hell in a handbasket so much as they are in a toboggan and, oh yes, someone's greased the tracks. But it's a glorious ride, all the way. I'm still reading and loving the series and anxiously awaiting the next one because I want to know what he'll do.

    He also is very good at making me love his villains. The bastich.

    In the humor and modern supernatural, I'm gonna say Christopher Moore. It's easy not to take him too seriously -- he writes funny stuff -- but when it comes down to it, anyone who commits to writing a humorous "lost gospel" about Jesus's best buddy, Biff, has got to be acknowledged for his willingness to think outside the box.

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  50. OOOO I've always loved stories where the author takes a risk...

    So many good ones have already been named so I'm going to reach back into my reading past: Mercedes Lackey with her Last Herald Mage series.

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  51. GRR Martin

    All nice characters will get killed

    :-)

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  52. Octavia E. Butler!! Took risks in every book she wrote. Amazing writer. So sad she passed away before her time. READ HER BOOKS!

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  53. I think I'm quite a safe reader. LOL - or just not very good at coming up with suggestions.

    But Kelley Armstrong for deciding after two amazingly popular werewolf books that she wasn't going to stick to the formula that worked. And instead was going to tackle other supernaturals.

    And Wen Spencer, who is always trying something new - space opera, science fiction, fantasy.

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  54. Please toss my name into the hat.

    I agree with most of the authors listed above. Elizabeth George and Suzanne Brockman took the biggest risks recently. I know a lot of readers felt betrayed by Ms. George when she killed off a major well loved character when things were finally going right for her(the character). And I was surprized by the backlash against Ms. Brockman over the gay relationship since it was between a suipporting character over many books and his love interest of some time. But then I read almost every genre so bending the genre "rules" doesn't matter much to me.

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  55. Terry Pratchett, Neil Gaiman, Ursula LeGuin, and Stephen Donaldson.

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  56. Everybody has listed several authors I need to check out. I have B & N gift card just waiting to be used,

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  57. Hmmm, Meljean Brooke comes to mind for me. Her characters are never what you'd call vanilla. Another would probably be Suzanne Brockman though not only for her gay protagonists. Oh, and in my recent reading, I'd say Patricia Briggs 'specially what she did with Iron Kissed.

    I think that when an author isn't afraid of showing his/her characters foibles, major or minor and emotions that aren't the most noble and righteous its a large risk.

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  58. I would vote for you.

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  59. One of the most unexpected books that I have read was Exchange of Hostages by Susan R. Matthews (or Mathews). I am always boggled by the fact that a nascent sadistic torturer can end up a hero, or at least as much as hero as the book can stand.

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  60. You, Neil Gaiman, Anne Bishop to name a few. I would love an ARC of TF. Please throw my name in the hat.

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  61. You, for one. Holly Lisle, J.R. Ward, Laurell K. Hamilton.

    I would love to have an ARC of TF.

    Cheers,
    Erin K.

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  62. I'd say Laurell K Hamilton and Lyndsay Sands. Other than that, my name goes into the hat :)

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  63. Please throw my name in the hat :)
    Mary2

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  64. Penelope Williamson. She started out as a typical romance writer and took it too a whole other levle, then just ditched the whole genre for mystery. I'd put Teresa Weir in as a risk taker too.

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  65. Allen Wyler has definitely hooked me with his unique novels.

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  66. Ohhh, interesting. I'm working my way through the Darkyn (with "Night Lost") right now and "Evermore" on the shelf. I loved Lucan-read him on my way home coming back this weekend. One author who I think takes big risks is J.R. Ward in her Black Dagger Brotherhood series. She has alpha heroes, but in her last published book, "Lover Unbound" the hero was arguably bisexual (began the book in love with a male vampire), had raped a male in the past, and his Happily Ever After ended up into a ghost. I didn't love "Lover Unbound" and was unhappy with the book, but that is one writer who takes risks in her writing.

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  67. um you for one and maybe LKH. Please put me in thie draw for this book.

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  68. Hat, Hat, Hat!

    I've been such a terrible reader lately that I can't even recall another author's name, let alone what they write.

    I'm so glad you're so much more focused than I am. :)

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  69. Add me in to the mix.

    As for writers who takes risks:

    John Steakley: Forget the much maligned John Carpenter "my budget go cut by 2/3rds on the first day of filming" version of his novel Vampires and pick it up. The book which bears little resemblance to the movie deals with a Vatican sponsored group of vampire hunters and has the pope as a character.

    Also I would suggests Walter Jon Williams' "The Rift." It's a daunting size (900+ pages) which, unless you're Stephen King isn't the norm these days, and gives a plausible look at what's going to happen when (not if) the New Madrid fault goes again. It also has an unflinching look at racism in action.

    Finally, I'd say Steven Barnes Lion's Blood and Zulu Heart. It's a look at what happens if Africa as the dominant power in the world, and not Europe, colonizes America.

    Colin

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  70. Ooooo, now I can't wait to read it, and I'll have to. Darn you for getting my appetite all whetted. =op

    My brain is empty this morning, so I'll just throw my name in the hat.

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  71. Neil Gaiman

    He's one of my favorites too.

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  72. I like Eve Kenin, J.R. Ward, even Rachel Caine, all refreshing, risk takers.....

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  73. I have followed Laurell K Hamilton from the beginning no matter where she leads me. Same for J.R. Ward. Um let's see who else? Oh yeah, that cool author Lynn Viehl ;) Please put my name in the hat, I loved Evermore and I would love to see what happens next.

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  74. How can I NOT participate? I've been dying [literally, here] from Darkyn syndrome. I need a fix. STAT!

    WARNING: SPOILERS!



    I would have to go with JR Ward. Especially in LU. She definitely took a risk by killing the female heroine and making her corporeal. When you think romance, you think...happy endings. While this was a happy ending, a lot perceived it wrong. I do give kuddos to JR for taking a risk [especially in the romance genre] and giving us something different to work with. It didn't specifically "fit" with the genre, but it certainly added a kick into. And it taught fans that anything goes.

    Btw, LOVE what you do Lynn. I will always be grateful for writing the Darkyn series and for also taking chances.

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  75. Kim Harrison and Rachel Caine come to mind as risk takers in their writing.

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  76. I'm going to say Colleen Gleason and Allison Brennan.

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  77. Please please count me in. As for risk taking authors Morgan Hawke's science fiction erotica is very much outside the box.

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  78. I'm late to Shana Abe, but I'm really enjoying her work, though I didn't expect to.

    I love Joely Sue Burkhart. 'nuff said there.

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  79. Besides you, I'd have to say Robin McKinley with Sunshine which I have to reread about twice a year.

    And definitely Rob Thurman with her Cal Leandros series.

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  80. Hmm, an author that takes risks...I would echo Anne Bishop, and add Elizabeth Hoyt, Jennie Crusie and Sharon Shinn.

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  81. Chuck Palahniuk, the twisted mind behind Fight Club, Haunted, and so many other twisted stories that make me squirm. He's the graphic sort of shocking that you can't turn away from, even though you know you probably morally should - like a gory car wreck.

    Also Marjorie Liu, who I noticed has been mentioned before. Her style is very poetic, doesn't wedge right into the mainstream, but still remains popular. I think I read somewhere that she was told she should adapt a pen name, because people wouldn't buy books from an Asian-sounding author - bad enough the books have inter-racial relationships. Whoever told her that is a complete moron.

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  82. Amysee - I remember reading on a review I think it was for Prisoner of Conscience by Susan R.Mathews, but it may have been for Exchange of Hostages. That the only way you knew he was the hero was because he was the only interrogator who didn't sodomize his valet. That's just a quote that's stuck in my head.

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  83. I would LOVE to be counted in on the ARC :) I think an author that takes risks is Karen Marie Moning very steamy stuff

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  84. My vote goes to Kit Whitfield, for her book Bareback (released as Benighted in the US) - there's a werewolf book that's nothing like what you would expect a werewolf book to be!

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  85. when I think of an author who takes risks, I think of you. I'd love to win an ARC of Val's book.

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  86. I agree with Tamara Siler Jones as a risk taker who makes it work. I love the Burma Shave approach on this one -- I'm enticed. You're a superb risk-taker, too.

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  87. I love J. R. Ward, and L.A. Banks I think they both take risks.

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  88. Tossing my name in the hat with a few already mentioned. J.R. Ward, Anne Bishop's Black Jewels Trilogy, and Tamara Siler Jones with her Dubric.

    I also reread on a regular basis Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel series. It starts off small but ends up big. And a pain loving courtesan as a protag, that has to be a little outside the mainstream.

    Oh, and William Goldman - The Princess Bride.

    Does anybody want a peanut?

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  89. Hi, I'd say Neil Gaiman is a bit of a risk taker and I do enjoy his books.

    Tossing my name in the hat ^^

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  90. I'm also tossing my name in.

    Sherman Alexie. JR Ward definately took risks with the whole Butch/V. relationship.
    I also just finished reading a novel by Jeaniene Frost. It was a little untraditional for a romance, especially the ending.

    Cheers!
    Jessica

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  91. Hmmm...
    I guess Jodi Picoult should be mentioned.
    She writes stories that others would let untold (like My Sisters Keeper) Her characters are so "human". Seriuos stuff.
    Hot stuff *lol*: definitely you and Sherilyn Kennyon
    Those guys... *sigh*
    If Val's story is only half as good as Lucan's, I will melt away. Lucan is my favorite ;-)

    Thnx for the Darkyns

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  92. Someone already mentioned her, but Joey Hill. Not so much for what she writes but how she writes it.

    You sure know how to whet the appetite.

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  93. I think my comment got eaten. I'm truly sorry if I already posted. I am a bit bad at this new method.

    Carol Berg's Transformation. For telling the story of a prince and his trials and how he evolves as a person all through the eyes of a slave's first person POV.

    Here's hoping this goes through alright *crosses fingers*

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  94. Anya Bast's "Elemental Witches" series, J.R Ward, Morgan Hawke, and Patrick Calfia. I think right now Anne Rice is taking a huge risk writing about the boy Jesus

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  95. ok, I think mine got eaten too?!?!
    Anya Bast's Elemental Witches series is risky, as well as J.R. Ward, Morgan Hawke, and Patrick Calfia. Also, I think Anne Rice is taking huge risks writing about the boy Jesus, instead of the vampires

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  96. Almost all mine are already taken... I'll see your bets of LKH, JR Ward, Anne Bishop, Mercedes Lackey's Herald Mage books (couldn't believe someone else remembered those!), and raise you a Jim Butcher's Dresden Files books because Harry is a complete loon of a protagonist (in an enjoyable way - love his sarcasm) with a romantic streak a mile wide that all the bad guys know about and abuse, but he still won't give up or give in. Plus, half the time, he doesn't even save his own butt, let alone anyone else's. It's refreshing not having perfect heroes.

    Thanks for the ARC opportunity. And I have greatly enjoyed your books and your blog! Thanks so much!

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  97. Anne Bishop, Lora Leigh, Morgan Hawke, I had high hopes for Vishous and Butch in the last JR Ward book, but I kind of think that one went a little off for me. Butch and V had a solid totally hot connection and it went nowhere which was really dissapointing for me.

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  98. I think Meljean Brook takes some interesting risks. Her characters, like yours, are not vanilla.

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  99. JR Ward and Keri Arthur come to mind when I think of risk takers.

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  100. Chritie Golden, Christine Feehan, Laurell K. Hamilton, and Collen Gleason. Thanks for an awesome contest!

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  101. Strange as it may seem, I think that James Patterson has taken a few risks in his career. He's known for these wonderful thriller/mystery novels and yet he's written two beautiful, daring romance novels. For a best selling author known for a certain genre, who also happens to be a man, that's a huge risk.
    Thanks. Love, love, love the Darkyn series.

    *sorry if this is a duplicate posting, just getting the hang of this*

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  102. C.E. Murphy,

    House of Cards trilogy. Those books keep you guessing at every turn

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  103. Writers who take the Risk...Well, for me JR WARD...and Lora Leigh...I find myself sinking into my bed thinking "..are you gonna go there? - "OMG you just did"...

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  104. How could I forget to mention Anne Stuart. She takes major risks and they always pay off.

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  105. is it just me or do my comments just not show up!! This is my third pathetic attempt to post..

    Pfft..

    *cries*

    *kicks computer*

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