Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Writer Junk Journal

Back in January I promised to show you how I made a trio of small journals out of some ordinary materials -- which I did with a pack of index cards and a deck of playing cards. This month I had the final challenge of making a journal out of this mini spiral-bound notebook:



Which is now a writer junk journal:



To make this journal I first tore out half the pages (more on what I did with them later in the post) and used the remaining pages as foundations for some interesting specimens from my paper recycle bin. I covered each page front and back with old calendar pictures, junk mail, cutouts from magazines, old photos and postcards, trimmings and other discarded bits. I framed each page with some decorative paper tape left over from last year's massive art project and added a few pockets, tags and little envelopes throughout for writing and saving notes.



I didn't plan anything or go with a particular theme, which made it fun to assemble. Once I had the pages refurbished I made a quilted cover for the journal out of a damaged quilt block. I'm still figuring out how I want to fasten it together so for now I just have a strip of muslin tied around it:



As for the pages I tore out, I trimmed off the binding tatters, cut them into strips and chunks of various sizes and tucked them into an envelope I mounted in the back. These will come in handy when I want to write a note about something to add to the pages:



A junk journal can be used for whatever you want to note and save. I think they're a great way to journal small because with the lined pages covered you won't feel pressured to fill them up with writing. You can add a few words or a note to any page, or just tuck something into one of the envelopes. I'm going to use mine for magazine clipping, articles, take-out cookie fortunes and other little things that would otherwise get lost in the shuffle.



This was a good practice project for me, too, as it's the first junk journal I've ever made. Working on this little journal has given me a confidence boost to try my hand at a more ambitious project: transforming this old beauty into . . . well, you'll just have to wait and see.

14 comments:

  1. These are so beautiful! They definitely do not look like junk but have a story to tell. Happy first of Spring!

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    1. Thank you, Na. I don't know who came up with the junk name but I like to think of them more as art/keepsake books. Junk is a shorter name, though. :)

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  2. That looks like fun! Definitely going to have to try this one as well.

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    1. You can customize them for writing projects, too, Anna. I'm thinking of doing a couple more with a Disenchanted & Co. theme so I can save all my series-related bits.

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  3. Fran K10:00 AM

    You made a boring pad into a beautiful piece of art. I'm happy to think I can start working on something tonight now that my new sewing machine has arrived - I can't wait to play! Wish me luck ..

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    1. That's terrific news -- I hope you're sewing like mad, Fran. :)

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  4. This is beautiful and it sounds like so much fun to make! I'm definitely going to try this!

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    1. Very easy, too -- you don't have to get complicated, just grab a glue stick and an old magazine and go to work. :)

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  5. Giving this a go! Looking forward to just giving into the junk and seeing what beauty comes from it! Cheers for this!

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    1. Not planning the theme made me less inclined to be perfect, Ann. In my case that is very necessary, lol.

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  6. I love this. It's fun and different and will hold so much. I do want to ask though, did you use one page per decoration? Or did you use a couple together with the edges taped with the paper tape. I only ask because I'd be afraid single pages would pull out too easily. Then again, I'm a little hard on my notebooks.

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    1. I didn't use any heavyweight materials, Theo, so one page worked fine as a foundation. If you want to use cardboard or something heavier I think two or three pages glued together would make a sturdier foundation.

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  7. Looks amazing!

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